Book Reviews

Review: It’s Not You, It’s the Workplace β€’ a look at women’s relationships at work

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It’s not every day I find myself nodding in agreement with most thing written in a book. Yet, here we are, with me writing a glowing review of It’s Not You, It’s the Workplace and asking you to read it with a group of girlfriends.

Title: It’s Not You, It’s the Workplace
Authors: Andrea S. Kramer and Alton B. Harris
Genre: Adult Nonfiction, Business
Published on August 27th, 2019 by Nicholas Brealey

s y n o p s i s

Women’s relationships with other women in the workplace are a nuanced subject. Yet, that hasn’t stopped sensationalist news articles and misguided studies from being published. Women are commonly portrayed as being bitchy, back-stabbers, and hostile toward other women. But the reality is far more complex.

Andrea S. Kramer and Alton B. Harris are here to dispell the myths surrounding this topic. With their data-driven account of female relationships in the workplace, the reader gets a far more substantial and accurate portrayal of the issue at hand.

Disclaimer: I have received a complimentary digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. However, this has not changed my opinions.

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Book Reviews

Review: Opioid, Indiana β€’ A week in Trump’s rural America through a teen’s eyes

Title: Opioid, Indiana
Author: Brian Allen Carr
Genre: Young adult contemporary fiction
Published on: September 17, 2019 by Soho Press

Disclaimer: I received a digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. This has not changed my rating or review. Thank you to the publisher for access to the galley.

Synopsis

During a week-long suspension from school, a teenage transplant to impoverished rural Indiana searches for a job, the whereabouts of his vanished drug-addicted guardian, and meaning in the America of the Trump years.

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Book Reviews

Ayesha at Last: review! // sweet, bold, and hilarious

If you remember from the beginning of the year, I have been super pumped to read Ayesha at Last since I saw it was being published. Luckily, I managed to grab a review copy and let me tell you, this is such an adorable and wholesome story!!!

Title: Ayesha at Last
Author: Uzma Jalaluddin
Genre: adult contemporary fiction
Published on June 4th 2019 by Berkley Books
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

synopsis

Ayesha Shamsi has a lot going on. Her dreams of being a poet have been set aside for a teaching job, she lives with her boisterous Muslim family, and she is always reminded that her younger cousin Hafsa is close to rejecting her one hundredth marriage. Then, she meets Khalid, a man who is just as handsome and smart as he is religious, conservative, and judgmental. She is irritatingly attracted to someone who looks down on her choices and dresses like he belongs in the seventh century. When she hears gossip concerning his family and her younger cousin, Ayesha realizes she must deal with this newly learning information and with her conflicting feelings for Khalid.

Thanks for the free book, @PRHGlobal/@prhinternational!

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Book Reviews

Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune: review! // heart-warming tale + foods of my life

I’ve been looking forward to reading this book since the beginning of the year. I was rejected twice for the review copy, but the bookish gods smiled upon me and I received one in my inbox! It was everything I had hoped it to be and even more. It’s safe to say it’s one of the best books I’ve read in 2019.

Title: Natalie Tan’s Book of Luck and Fortune
Author: Roselle Lim
Genre: Adult, contemporary fiction
Published on June 11th, 2019 by Berkley Books
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

🍜 s y n o p s i s 🍜

When Natalie Tan receives the news that her mother has passed away, she hops on a plane from Toronto to San Francisco, her hometown. The two women hadn’t been in touch in years, since Natalie left home to pursue her dream of becoming a chef, against her mom’s wishes. As Natalie handles funeral arrangements, she rediscovers San Francisco’s Chinatown, the place where she grew up. Family secrets are revealed, gentrification threatens to kill the neighborhood, and Natalie goes on a self-discovery journey without leaving Chinatown.

πŸ“– Add it to Goodreads

Thanks for the free book, @PRHGlobal & @prhinternational

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Book Reviews

9 Reasons You Should Read Not Your Backup + quiz! // {blog tour}

Hi friends! Today is Not Your Backup‘s book birthday! This book is out in the world today!!! And I got the chance to take part in its awesome blog tour organized by none other than CW @ The Quiet Pond!

Can you tell I’m excited to share a character quiz and a list with a bunch of reasons why you should be just as excited as I am about this book coming out? I think you can!

Title: Not Your Backup
Author: C.B. Lee (author website)
Published on June 1st, 2019 by Duet Books (imprint of Interlude Press)
Genre: young adult, superheroes, fiction
Series? Yes, 3rd book in Sidekick Squad series

⭐️ synopsis ⭐️

Emma Robledo has a few more responsibilities than the usual high school senior, but then again, she and her friends have left school to lead a fractured Resistance movement against a corrupt Heroes League of Heroes. Emma is the only member of a supercharged team without powers, and she isn’t always taken seriously. A natural leader, Emma is determined to win this battle, and when that’s done, get back to school. As the Resistance moves to challenge the League, Emma realizes where her place is in this fight: at the front.

πŸ“– Add it to Goodreads πŸ“–

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Book Reviews

We Have Always Been Here: review! // a queer muslim memoir

2019 is the year of me reading more memoirs, especially those written by people like me. This memoir written by Samra Habib, a queer Pakistani-Canadian woman, falls very clearly into this category. And I am glad I got the chance to read it.

Title: We Have Always Been Here: A Queer Muslim Memoir
Author: Samra Habib
Genre: Memoir, Adult
Published on June 4, 2019 by Viking
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️

s y n o p s i s

Samra Habib was raised as an Ahmadi Muslim in Lahore, Pakistan. Living in a world in which her family was persecuted for their religious beliefs and constantly having her fate laid out before her for being a woman stuck with her as she grew up. When her family decides to leave Pakistan to Canada for a fear of being executed or tortured, Samra finds a whole new world. There, she felt conflicted between following her family’s plan for her of marrying as a teen or pursuing higher education. Samra begins an exploration of herself through art, sexuality, religion, and faith.

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Book Reviews

Austentatious: The Evolving World of Jane Austen Fans {review}

I’ve never been a big fan of Jane Austen, but the premise of this short book convinced me 100% to read it β€” and I don’t regret picking it up at all! If you’re a fan of Austen or interested in the author, this book will be entertaining to you.

Title: Austentatious: The Evolving World of Jane Austen Fans
Author: Holly Luetkenhaus & Zoe Weinstein
Genre: Nonfiction, adult
Published on June 3rd, 2019 by Iowa University Press
Page count: 188 pages
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

For an author whose work was written almost two centuries ago, there are plenty of fan-made material online in a variety of different medias. From novel adaptations such as the 1995 Pride and Prejudice BBC mini-series or Clueless to thousands of fanfiction pieces, it is clear that the love for Jane Austen is far from being dead. The writers of this book explore how online fan spaces work, how Austen fans (“Janeites”) share their passion, and why being a Janeite matters to so many women and nonbinary people.

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Book Reviews

This Land Is Our Land: review!

Immigration is a topic I’m very much interested in. So, when I saw this nonfiction book up for grabs on NetGalley, I couldn’t stop myself. While it was an enjoyable read, it feels somewhat shallow and lacking.

Title: This Land Is Our Land: An Immigrant’s Manifesto
Author: Sekutu Mehta
Genre: Nonfiction, current affairs, adult
Published on May 14th, 2019 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️

A timely argument for why the United States and the West would benefit from accepting more immigrants” Suketu Mehta, an Indian writer based in New York, puts to paper a list of reasons why immigration should be seen as a positive thing for Western countries. Drawing from his experience as an immigrant in the United Kingdom, the Middle East, and the United States, Mehta analyses Trump’s immigration politics.

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Book Reviews

The Confessions of Frannie Langton: review! // not another slavery novel

I am so happy I had the chance to read this novel. It bent a lot of my expectations and taught me that going into a book blind can be a great thing! More people need to know Frannie’s story, which is why I bring you this review today.

Title: The Confessions of Frannie Langton
Author: Sara Collins
Genre: Historical Fiction, adult
Published on May 21st, 2019 by Harper
Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️

London, 1826. The city is a frenzy awaiting to hear the outcome of Frannie Langton’s trial. The Jamaican maid is being charged with two murders, that of Mr. and Mrs. Benham, her masters. Frannie swears she did not kill anyone, but the evidence seems damning β€” slave, whore, black, seductress β€” and the prosecution is itching to have her hung. But for the first time, Frannie tells her story in this book.

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Trigger warnings: mentions of rape, gore, miscarriage, physical and emotional violence

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Book Reviews

The Satapur Moonstone: review! // a gripping crime novel set in 1920s India

Last year, I had the pleasure of picking up The Widows of Malabar Hill, the first book following the life of female lawyer Perveen (review here). Needless to say I loved it and was super excited to pick up the sequel. Surprisingly, I would say I even loved this one more!

Title: The Satapur Moonstone
Author: Sujata Massey
Genre: Crime, historical fiction, adult
Published on May 14th 2019 by Soho Crime
Rating: 4 stars

During the rainy season in India, 1922, Perveen Mistry, one of India’s only female lawyers, is called by the British Raj to settle a dispute between the two Purdah-observing marahanis of the princely state of Satapur. After the marahja’s sudden death and the first male heir was killed in a tragic hunting accident, everyone seems to think there is a curse plaguing the royal family. But Perveen is called to decide on the young, future maharaja’s education. Should he be homeschooled? Sent to a boarding school in India? Or should he attent a prestigious British school?

But trouble seems to follow Perveen, as she quickly finds herself between a rock and a hard place. Cold-blooded power plays and ancient vendettas soon spring up and threaten everyone’s safety. How can Perveen rotect the royal children from the palace’s deadly curse?

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